If You’re Not Eating Brussels Sprouts, You Should! Here’s Why This Hot Veggie Is On Trend Right Now

11.9.18_Noja_IfYou’reNotEatingBrusselSprouts,YouShould!Here’sWhyThisHotVeggieIsOnTrendRightNow

A cruciferous vegetable similar to cauliflower and kale, brussel sprouts often get a bad rep for their sulphuric taste and smell when overcooked. However, properly prepared brussel sprouts have a sweet, mild flavor and a handful of health benefits.

Brussel sprouts are high in nutrients and low in calories. They contain many essential vitamins and minerals as well as high levels of fiber. Certain nutrients in brussel sprouts are thought to help prevent cancer, reduce inflammation and heart disease and increase insulin sensitivity.

Vitamin K

Vitamin K is essential in promoting blood clotting and bone health. Brussel sprouts’ high levels of vitamin K increase coagulation and encourage bone growth which protects against osteoporosis. Individuals taking daily medications should consult a doctor before increasing their intake of vitamin K.

Vitamin C

Brussel sprouts contain high levels of vitamin C which aids in the growth and repair of tissues within the body. Vitamin C is important for immune health as well as iron absorption – specifically non-heme iron. Non-heme iron is the iron found in plant sources and the body does not as easily absorb it as iron from animal sources. High levels of vitamin C allow those with plant-based diets to absorb beneficial amounts of iron that they otherwise may not have gotten.

High in Fiber

Fiber is essential in relieving constipation, feeding beneficial gut bacteria, reducing the risk of heart disease and improving blood sugar levels. Fiber slows the absorption of sugar in the blood helping to regulate blood sugar.

ALA Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Omega-3 fatty acids reduce blood triglycerides, slow cognitive decline, reduce insulin resistance and decrease inflammation. The body has an easier time converting the omega-3s that are found in fish and other seafood, so those with a plant-based diet, or those who dislike seafood, need to intake more ALA omega-3 fatty acids, a specific type found in brussel sprouts, that the body can convert to the more active omega-3s found in fish.

Easy to Prepare

Brussel sprouts can be roasted, boiled, sautéed or even baked. Simply cut the ends off, mix the sprouts with some olive oil, salt and pepper, and roast them until they become crispy. If needed, remove the outer leaves of each sprout to get down to the rich green color (not darker green or yellow), as that is the most nutritious and tasty part of the sprout. Sprouts can be cut to desired thickness and added to pasta, stir-fries, used as a side dish or even added to nutritious smoothies.

Looking to try brussel sprouts but don’t want to prepare them yourself? Eat at Noja – a Mediterranean-Asian restaurant in the heart of downtown Mobile with an ever-evolving menu.

It’s Noja’s attention to detail and our focus on farm-fresh ingredients that has allowed us to continue to serve this area for so long. For an intimate meal in one of the Port City’s longest-running restaurants in Downtown Mobile, make a reservation to Noja. We have both indoor and outdoor seating in a secluded area, just steps from Dauphin Street in LODA at 6 N. Jackson Street. To reserve a table now, call 251-433-0377. Learn more about our cuisine and offerings at www.nojamobile.com or on our Facebook page.

© Hummingbird and South 2018: Reproduction without explicit permission is prohibited. All Rights Reserved. “We Put You Online So You Don’t Get Left Behind.”